A 10-minute health check for mining manager résumés

Resume Check.pdf

10 minute résumé health check

In a recent survey, two thirds of senior mining managers and leaders told us they are either already looking for their next role or would consider a new role if the right one landed on their desk today.

This begs the question: if the right opportunity came your way today, would your résumé be up to scratch for submission?

Clients expect the best mining recruitment consultancies to provide shortlists much more quickly these days. If you need to wait until a spare weekend to get your CV ready, you might miss out on the opportunity to be put forward at the earliest opportunity.

This article doesn’t aim to provide definitive guidance on writing a résumé. But if you have a spare ten minutes, why not invest them in your future career by giving your résumé a quick health check?

  1. CAN YOU FIND YOUR MOST UP-TO-DATE CV OR RÉSUMÉ?

Be honest. Can you quickly lay your hands on your most up-to-date résumé? Or would you, like many people, be searching your hard drive and turning up any number of out-of-date copies?

If you want to keep old or alternative versions (and I appreciate they can come in handy) create an archive folder within your main résumé folder and save them there. Sort out version control by incorporating the date into the filename of your document.

  1. ARE YOUR CONTACT DETAILS CORRECT?

Basic stuff I know, but worth checking. Make sure you have a professional email address. Avoid references to race, gender, religion, or particularly wild things in your username. Nicknames can get you remembered for all the wrong reasons

Email is an ideal way to first contact someone about a job, so ensure you’re giving an email address you can — and will — check regularly and frequently.

  1. IS YOUR CURRENT POSITION LISTED?

Once you’ve landed a new role, adding it to your CV is probably not your highest priority. But it makes sense to get it on there now, together with a brief summary of the skills you’ve demonstrated and recent measurable achievements.

  1. ARE YOU COLLECTING EVIDENCE OF ACHIEVEMENTS FOR THIS ROLE?

I always encourage candidates to keep records of any measurable achievements that can be used on a résumé, ideally with supporting evidence. If you’re not doing this already, now is a great time to start.

  1. ARE YOU CONFIDENT YOU CAN SUBSTANTIATE YOUR ACHIEVEMENTS IN PREVIOUS ROLES?

Read through the achievements you have for earlier roles. Are you confident you can talk about them fluently in an interview? Can you still describe your role in the process?

  1. CHECK YOUR REFEREES

It’s not essential to have referees listed but if you choose to do so, double check you’re including the most appropriate people and that their contact details are correct. Are they even still with the same company?

You might want to get in touch to make sure they are still happy to be contacted. It’s courteous and might result in a helpful networking conversation.

  1. HAVE YOU ADDED ANY COURSES OR TRAINING YOU’VE COMPLETED RECENTLY?

If you’ve completed any personal development in your current role, it’s worth making a note of it. Evidence of continuing professional development will always impress potential employers and it’s all too easy to forget short courses a few months down the line.

  1. DOES IT REFLECT YOUR ASPIRATIONS AS WELL AS YOUR ACHIEVEMENTS?

A résumé is a historical document, but it’s useful if it reflects your aspirations. If you have a clear career plan in mind that means your next role will require financial management skills, make sure your résumé reflects some experience of that.

  1. DOES IT STILL READ WELL?

The one benefit of not looking at your résumé for a while is that you can now read it with a fresh pair of eyes. Search for errors, inconsistencies, layout issues and any hint of BS. Read it out loud if you have time.

  1. GET SOMEONE ELSE TO READ IT, TOO

It’s tough to proofread your own work. If you can get ten minutes of anyone else’s time, ask them to check your document for typos, grammatical errors and sense. This objective check can be invaluable; what makes sense to you won’t always be clear to others.

If all you can spare is ten minutes this weekend, see these steps as the diagnosis stage and make time to address any issues as soon as possible. After all, you can never predict when the next opportunity will come your way.

 — Jane Banks in Principal Consultant for Stratum International, based in their North America office in Washington DC. With nearly 20 years’ experience in international executive search and more than a decade specializing exclusively in mining recruitment for Corporate and Operations roles, Jane has a track record of more than 600 successful searches within the sector.
Stratum International is a global mining recruitment and executive search consultancy specializing in business-critical roles in mining operations and mining project development. We can help clients find and attract mining project and operations professionals at the top of their game.

Stratum’s consultants are recognized experts in the field, focused on knowing the best mining talent available. They cultivate relationships with senior professionals across specific mining disciplines, including Project Development, Mine Operations and Executive Leadership, helping them plan their careers. This proactive contact means Stratum can provide clients with candidate shortlists in days rather than weeks. Please visit www.stratum-international.com for more information.

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